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Solar Report 2030 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 54 min 50 sec ago
Solar Flux: 70 | Ap: 2 | Kp 0
Categories: Amateur Radio

Observed Space Weather 2030 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 54 min 50 sec ago
No space weather storms were observed for the past 24 hours.
Categories: Amateur Radio

Forecast Space Weather 2030 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 54 min 50 sec ago
No space weather storms are predicted for the next 24 hours.
Categories: Amateur Radio

Flares 2030 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 54 min 50 sec ago
(0000 UTC) 6h hi (none) 24h hi (none)
Categories: Amateur Radio

Sunspots 2030 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 54 min 50 sec ago
SSN: 0 (10/19/2018)
Categories: Amateur Radio

Solar Wind 2030 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 54 min 50 sec ago
Solar Wind: 292 km/s @ 11.0 protons/cm3 Bz: 2018 Oct 20 2025Z at -0.8 nT
Categories: Amateur Radio

Global Conditions 2030 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 54 min 50 sec ago
Global HF Propagation Conditions for 2000Z on 20 Oct, 2018
Categories: Amateur Radio

Researchers Secretly Deployed A Bot That Submitted Bug-Fixing Pull Requests

Slashdot - 1 hour 51 min ago
An anonymous reader quotes Martin Monperrus, a professor of software at Stockholm's KTH Royal Institute of Technology: Repairnator is a bot. It constantly monitors software bugs discovered during continuous integration of open-source software and tries to fix them automatically. If it succeeds to synthesize a valid patch, Repairnator proposes the patch to the human developers, disguised under a fake human identity. To date, Repairnator has been able to produce 5 patches that were accepted by the human developers and permanently merged in the code base... It analyzes bugs and produces patches, in the same way as human developers involved in software maintenance activities. This idea of a program repair bot is disruptive, because today humans are responsible for fixing bugs. In others words, we are talking about a bot meant to (partially) replace human developers for tedious tasks.... [F]or a patch to be human-competitive 1) the bot has to synthesize the patch faster than the human developer 2) the patch has to be judged good-enough by the human developer and permanently merged in the code base.... We believe that Repairnator prefigures a certain future of software development, where bots and humans will smoothly collaborate and even cooperate on software artifacts. Their fake identity was a software engineer named Luc Esape, with a profile picture that "looks like a junior developer, eager to make open-source contributions... humans tend to have a priori biases against machines, and are more tolerant to errors if the contribution comes from a human peer. In the context of program repair, this means that developers may put the bar higher on the quality of the patch, if they know that the patch comes from a bot." The researchers proudly published the approving comments on their merged patches -- although a conundrum arose when repairnator submitted a patch for Eclipse Ditto, only to be told that "We can only accept pull-requests which come from users who signed the Eclipse Foundation Contributor License Agreement." "We were puzzled because a bot cannot physically or morally sign a license agreement and is probably not entitled to do so. Who owns the intellectual property and responsibility of a bot contribution: the robot operator, the bot implementer or the repair algorithm designer?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source

NASA Has Explored Manned Missions To Venus

Slashdot - 2 hours 51 min ago
NASA recently developed a program for manned missions to explore Venus -- even though the planet's surface is 860 degrees, which NASA explains is "hot enough to melt lead." Long-time Slashdot reader Zorro shares this week's article from Newsweek: As surprising as it may seem, the upper atmosphere of Venus is the most Earth-like location in the solar system. Between altitudes of 30 miles and 40 miles, the pressure and temperature can be compared to regions of the Earth's lower atmosphere. The atmospheric pressure in the Venusian atmosphere at 34 miles is about half that of the pressure at sea level on Earth. In fact you would be fine without a pressure suit, as this is roughly equivalent to the air pressure you would encounter at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. Nor would you need to insulate yourself as the temperature here ranges between 68 degrees Fahrenheit and 86 degrees Fahrenheit. The atmosphere above this altitude is also dense enough to protect astronauts from ionising radiation from space. The closer proximity of the sun provides an even greater abundance of available solar radiation than on Earth, which can be used to generate power (approximately 1.4 times greater).... [C]onceivably you could go for a walk on a platform outside the airship, carrying only your air supply and wearing a chemical hazard suit. Venus is 8 million miles closer to Earth than Mars (though it's 100 times further away than the moon). But the atmosphere around Venus contains traces of sulphuric acid (responsible for its dense clouds), so the vessel would need to be corrosion-resistant material like teflon. (One NASA paper explored the possibility of airbone microbes living in Venus's atmosphere.) There's a slick video from NASA's Langley Research Center titled "A way to explore Venus" showcasing HAVOC -- "High Altitude Venus Operational Concept." "A recent internal NASA study...led to the development of an evolutionary program for the exploration of Venus," explains the project's page at NASA.gov, "with focus on the mission architecture and vehicle concept for a 30 day crewed mission into Venus's atmosphere." NASA describes the project as "no longer active," though adding that manned missions to the atmosphere of Venus are possible "with advances in technology and further refinement of the concept."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source

Solar Report 1830 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 2 hours 54 min ago
Solar Flux: 70 | Ap: 2 | Kp 0
Categories: Amateur Radio

Observed Space Weather 1830 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 2 hours 54 min ago
No space weather storms were observed for the past 24 hours.
Categories: Amateur Radio

Forecast Space Weather 1830 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 2 hours 54 min ago
No space weather storms are predicted for the next 24 hours.
Categories: Amateur Radio

Flares 1830 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 2 hours 54 min ago
(0000 UTC) 6h hi (none) 24h hi (none)
Categories: Amateur Radio

Sunspots 1830 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 2 hours 54 min ago
SSN: 0 (10/19/2018)
Categories: Amateur Radio

Solar Wind 1830 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 2 hours 54 min ago
Solar Wind: 290 km/s @ 11.0 protons/cm3 Bz: 2018 Oct 20 1827Z at 3.4 nT
Categories: Amateur Radio

Global Conditions 1830 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 2 hours 54 min ago
Global HF Propagation Conditions for 1800Z on 20 Oct, 2018
Categories: Amateur Radio

Watch What Happens When A Drone Slams Into An Airplane Wing

Slashdot - 3 hours 51 min ago
Long-time Slashdot reader Freshly Exhumed writes: Researchers at the University of Dayton Research Institute [Impact Physics Lab] have shown in a video what can happen when a high-mass, consumer-level drone strikes the wing of an aircraft. They provide visual evidence of the damage a 2.1-pound DJI Phantom 2 videography quadcopter would have upon the wing of a Mooney M20, a small, private aircraft. It is not difficult to extrapolate the effects upon an airliner in a similar situation. "We wanted to help the aviation community and the drone industry understand the dangers that even recreational drones can pose to manned aircraft before a significant event occurs," said Kevin Poormon of UDRI. The video -- titled "Risk in the Sky?" -- simulates a collision at 238 mph in which the drone tears open the wing's leading edge. "While the quadcopter broke apart, its energy and mass hung together to create significant damage to the wing," said Kevin Poormon, group leader for impact physics at UDRI.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source

Solar Report 1725 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 3 hours 55 min ago
Solar Flux: 70 | Ap: 2 | Kp 0
Categories: Amateur Radio

Observed Space Weather 1725 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 3 hours 55 min ago
No space weather storms were observed for the past 24 hours.
Categories: Amateur Radio

Forecast Space Weather 1725 20 Oct 2018

HFRadio.org - 3 hours 55 min ago
No space weather storms are predicted for the next 24 hours.
Categories: Amateur Radio

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